More Land for Wildlife in Adelaide River

We are welcoming more members every week who manage their land for native wildlife. Before we covered the story of Lloyd Beck from Adelaide River. Also in the region we have welcomed 2 other LFW properties in The Robin Falls region. Here are their stories-

Keith and Rick joined land for Wildlife late last year and shared with us their story-

Petit, Keith and Rick LFW sign (2)

Our place ‘Marumba’ ( good place ) its an Aboriginal word from the Jagera  (Yagera) people of  SE Qld where Rick was born.

sign keith and rick's

 We purchased the land 3 years ago after seeing a it advertised in the classified section of the NT News. Its outside Adelaide River near Robin Falls. Just under 140acres (63 hectares) of native bushland and no evidence of being farmed which appealed to us. There is a rocky ridge that crosses the block from north to south and from the top we look over the flood plain to the east and toward Litchfield NP in the west. We have a sheltered valley between the two long rocky ridges. There is a good mixture of habitats from treed areas to open grassland, hills, flood plains and numerous wet season billabongs.

Red leaves Keith and Rick's to house

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We are setting up an off the grid life from scratch, building using recycled materials as much as possible, we are always after old corrugated. iron, collecting rain water in tanks and using solar power. making as little impact on the planet as possible. We like to think of our place as a sanctuary for wildlife so no longer allow domestic pets such as dogs.

0ver the last 18 months we have been hosting volunteer helpers from around the world through Helpx and Workaway websites its been a fantastic experience to share our place, meet some amazing people from 18 to 68yrs and have the extra help.

One of things we love about being in nature with no neighbours is that we can spend all of our time not wearing clothes, which feels the more normal to us and allows us to feel more in tune to the surroundings

We recently started a Facebook page. ‘ Marumba – a good place’ if you want to see more of our place.

termite mound- keith and Rick's sunset keith and rick's sunrise keith and rick's

Mike is another newly joined member of Land for Wildlife in the Adelaide River region. He manages a beautiful piece of rocky Warrai country with a small creek running through it, and it is his primary residence in the Robin Falls regionMike sign

The vegetation is continuous with uncleared bush that eventually joins Litchfield National Park to the west. The 150 hectares is managed for wildlife conservation and includes stunning plants typical of the region including  Corymbia dichromophloia,(small fruited boodwood) Corymbia dunlopii, Eucalyptus tectifica, Eucalyptus tintinnans,(Salmon Gum) Owenia vernicosa, Calytrix brownii, Gardenia megasperma. Erythrophleum chlorostachyus (Ironwood), Corymbia foelscheana.

Gardenia megaspermaThere are also plenty of fruiting plants on the lower slopes and lush riparian flora on the creek edges. The creek edges have been enhanced planted to restore the riverine margins and the inner 20 acres of the block is burnt with a documented fire strategy of patchwork burning, but beyond this fire is harder to manage due to unprescribed burning.

Wrigley Creek 98.7% of the land is calculated to be remnant vegetation with a small area around the house assigned to productive plants and a dam. Only a few problems with Mission grass remain and a cane toad population which is being managed. There are regular sighting of water monitors, echidnas, dingos, wallabies/ wallaroos, fruit bats and many reptile and bird species; but unfortunately it seems the mammal species has declined in the last 8 years; very occasionally a pig or cow may wander through.

Mike trees

 Land management activities are often assisted by an informal group of friends and nearby landholders who enjoy being part of the process of conserving a valuable landscape.

Dry Season view2

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