Category Archives: LFW workshops/ events

Camera Trapping on LFW

The Land for Wildlife Top End was successful in receiving a grant from the NT Government’s Department of Environment and Natural resources to carry out a project to allow landholders in the program to monitor wildlife using nest boxes that have been installed for arboreal mammals. With this grant we have purchased 12 motion sensing cameras, and a further 6 with our own funds. These are the Reconyx Hyperfire 2 newly released model!

We have been working with RIEL scientist Leigh-Ann Woolley to choose the best cameras and set up, to record nest box use and arboreal mammals and develop a citizen science style project. The project aims to engage landholders and allow them to know more about arboreal mammals on their property but also add to data and understanding of nest box use and mammal presence in the Top End.

We will lend the cameras in rounds, 3 months at a time to landholders that have installed nest boxes. Once we have captured photographs from the cameras we will have an intern opportunity for a university student to collate and interpret data.

After the first year we will have the cameras as an asset to our program which can be lent to landholders to monitor targeted wildlife species in different ways.

We invited our first group of landholders to a workshop at Riyala in Noonamah to learn about how to install and use the cameras.

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We were joined by both Leigh-Ann Woolley and Jenni Risler, who have been studying the Black-footed Tree-rat. Leigh-Ann specifically has been studying nest box use on Coburg Peninsular and helped come up with bracket designs to hold cameras by nest box entrances. Jenni is has been researching the best camera trapping methods- so the perfect combination of assistance for us and our members!

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Treenie at Land for Wildlife had made brackets for the cameras, with some landholders keen to try out some other versions.

We had a test camera up on one of the boxes at Riyala, to show everyone the installation set up. After just 3 days there was plenty of possum action caught on camera!20180811_RCTW_Presentation_EL_Leanne_Jennifer_10_20_19_Pro

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We collectively decided to bait the nest boxes- with glass jars of peanut butter attached to the outside. This would answer two questions-

  • Are there arboreal mammals present
  • Are the arboreal mammals using the nest boxes (with the constant variable that there is bait nearby to attract them)

Camera workshop 2018

Landholders will install cameras for 3 months at a time and with assistance check that they are working. Some landholders attended and received new nest boxes and will set up cameras later in the program.

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Ian Morris, who is one of the land managers at Riyala spent the afternoon showing interested landholders around the property an dhow he had restored areas to rainforest from flogged out pasture land.

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Thanks also to Riyala for hosting and for making our morning tea look so lovely

IMG_9706Here’s hoping that we capture some Black-footed Tree-rats on camera!

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Regrowing land for Wildlife walk and workshop

Troy and Peter have been working on the 5 acre property in Leanyer over the last 2 years to restore it to native habitat, complete with beautifully landscaped paths using found rubble from the property. They also salvaged fill from construction sites and have planted over 500 plants. This hasn’t been easy and has involved a lot of hard work, removing vast amounts of Coffee bush, grassy weeds including Gamba and Mission Grass and concrete rubble; in fact many of the large native trees including beautiful Ghost gums and Milkwoods were only discovered on removal of the Coffee Bush.

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The 500 plants were mainly grown at the Greening Australia nursery but Pete and Troy have also been growing many plants themselves after attending propagation workshops, with successful acacias and native peanut trees popping up from the seed of trees planted just one year ago!

The difference in one year is incredible, with plants being planted with assistance from the Green Army in December 2016 and December 2017.

 

IN December during a guided walk and talk, a group of 16 people, including those also involved in the replanting program enjoyed a walk and landholder story. This was followed by seed collecting and propagating workshop by the pool and landholders got to practice and take plants home.

Last Photograph by Tissa Ratnayeke (NT Field Nats)

Bird Watching Walk and Plant Propagation Katherine

We spent some of bird week in Katherine, and Mick Jerram, Land for Wildlfie member and well renowned bird specialist hosted a Bird Watching tour on the 888 hectare Gorge Road property that he helps manage. A beautiful group of around 20 Katherine locals joined us to check out the property and birds.

We have been working together with Clare Pearce from Katherine Landcare group, who also double as Parks and Wildlife Community engagement officer. While we were there we also jointly hosted a plant propagation workshop and signed up another wonderful property on Gorge Road to Land for Wildlife, as well as checking nest boxes.


There are some fantastic residents down in Katherine with  more joining the program and we are looking towards a set up where Landcare Katherine can assist landholders in the region.
The Pickering family who have a wonderful property backing onto the Katherine River showed us their area of wildlife habitat and I showed Clare how we conduct an assessment. There are a few nest boxes on our properties in the area and we hope to run more events this year.

(Re)growing Land for Wildlife- Property Tour, walk, talk and workshop

Pretty shot .jpgLand for Wildlife members Peter and Troy have been working hard to re-grow wildlife habitat on their 5 acre property in Leanyer.

Peter and Troy

Come and share their landholders’ story of re-vegetating their block towards a beautifully landscaped wildlife habitat (from a previously big disturbed mess of Coffee Bush and grassy weeds). Be inspired by their hard work and also learn more about re-vegetation techniques, simple propagation techniques and the Black-footed Tree-rat enhancing habitat projects that Land for Wildlife are running.

Landscape view

Saturday 9th December

9 am- 11 am (or just after)

181 Leanyer Drive. An orange “Growing Towards Land for Wildlife” sign is on the gate.

Please park on the road. Dress ready for a short walk outside in the sun and bring a water bottle.

 

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A Green Army member, Anais and landholder Peter replacing any plants that did not make it through the dry season. Nov 2017.

Please RSVP if possible landforwildlife@greeningaustralia.org.au

Land for Wildlife Top End scoops 2 NT Environmental Awards

Land for Wildlife Top End scoops 2 NT Environmental Awards, for collaboration and “People’s Choice”- indicating that working together is a key to success and the program is greatly supported by members, partners and friends of the program. 

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Before I carry on I would like to say a huge THANK YOU to the supporters of the Land for Wildlife Top End program, members who are hard at work managing their land for wildlife habitat and all the partners who have made our programs possible, including the Territory Wildlife Park, Palmerston’s Mens Shed, Green Army, Leigh- Ann Woolley and the other scientists at RIEL and our funding partners.

 

I spent some days at the Territory NRM conference, giving a presentation about our Black-footed Tree-rat program alongside 7 other amazing speakers presenting on this subject. I also presented in a Gamba grass forum about our program and shared some great examples of Landholder victories as well as their frustrations.

At times when it can be disheartening working to conserve our native landscapes and inspire or  others, when there is a push for development and our natural environments often seem to be low down on the priority  list. It has been inspiring to attend the Territory NRM conference and see the work of some amazing people and organisations working in Land Management across the Northern Territory and I believe the strength we have is in working together and in collaboration. Our “People’s Choice” award was voted for by our members, partners, friends and supporters of the program. It obviously shows we have good support and is a great message, particularly to landholders and educational partners to keep up the great work.

Thank-you, Emma (Land for Wildlife Top End, program coordinator)

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With Land for Wildlife Landholders and managers in Humpty Doo sharing the award love

 

PRESS RELEASE

Land for Wildlife Top End has scooped up two environmental awards. The program was awarded “Australian Government Partnerships for Landcare” award in the NT Landcare Awards and “People’s Choice Award” in the Territory NRM Awards, where the program was a finalist in the “Collaborations in NRM”. The People’s Choice was voted upon by the public and our program was awarded it, we received huge support from members, partners and friends of the program. If anything this is a great message that the work of landholders and educational members is greatly appreciated, and the small amount of work by many is important, especially as Darwin expands and more bushland is developed. So keep up the great work, and we will keep telling the story and inspiring others. Let us spread the message to everyone that our native wildlife is important and amazing.

Land for Wildlife is a voluntary conservation program, supporting landholders to provide wildlife habitat through nature conservation, land management and promoting wildlife awareness and education. Land For Wildlife Top End is managed by environmental NGO Greening Australia. The program is run throughout different regions in Australia, managed by various organisations.

A growing number of landholders are joining the program which already has a diverse group of over 250 member properties covering 8,000 hectares of land in the greater Darwin region and into the Katherine area. The program has been expanding its work with other organisations to enhance land management outcomes with its members, to inspire and engage the greater community to appreciate and conserve wildlife and to mutually benefit other organisations. The power of collaboration enhances the overall effectiveness of habitat conservation and wildlife awareness objectives in the Top End utilising field experts to provide educational workshops and projects to engage landholders.

A recent focus on the enhancement of habitat for arboreal mammals, particularly the black-footed tree-rat has helped landholders and educational members install 150 nest boxes and plant over 5000 plants as food and habitat to provide benefits to this endangered species. Collaborators in these programs have included the Green Army (through Conservation Volunteers Australia), The Palmerston’s Men Shed, Researchers from RIEL at Charles Darwin University, specialists at the Department of Natural Resource Management, The Territory Wildlife Park, Remote Area Tree Services, Bush Fires NT and NTFRS, Landcare NT and of course the many landholders involved, including 3 primary schools, a reserve, and a Scout Camp.

The program is supported with some funding from Parks and Wildlife Commission Northern Territory and more recently has been able to carry out focused programs on enhancing habitat for the threatened Black-footed Tree-rat, installing nest boxes and planting trees with Land for Wildlife members with funding from Territory NRM and the Federal Government’s 20 Million Tree Program.

Land for Wildlife Top End was awarded for its collaboration with its landholders and partners with the ‘Australian Government Partnerships for Landcare Award’ for the program (NT Landcare Awards), as well as the “People’s Choice Award” in the Territory NRM Awards, in which the program was a finalist in “Best Collaboration in NRM Award”.

“These awards are a real acknowledgement of the work and key role our dedicated members play. It is ultimately because of them that Land for Wildlife is such a success. This program is a great example of how collective impact can achieve real and lasting change, and is well supported by landholders, partners and friends of the program” says Emma Lupin, Land for Wildlife Top End coordinator.

Land for Wildlife Top End is becoming increasingly important as wildlife habitat around Darwin is lost to development and remaining tracts of key native habitat is owned by private landholders.

Greening Australia is seeking additional funding to expand Land for Wildlife Top End to meet the growing demand.

For more information contact Emma Lupin, coordinator of the program at Greening Australia on landforwildlife@greeningaustralia.org.au or 0448 214 716.

(And congratulations to Land for Wildlife Central Australia, run through environmental consultants Low Ecological Services, who also received a Landcare award for “Best Community Group” in the NT Landcare Awards)

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At the Awards night with Land for Wildlife Central Australia. L to right- Land for Wildlife member Jo-Anne Scott, Land for Wildlife Top End Coordinator Emma Lupin, Land for Wildlife project officer and coordinator, Candice and Caragh from Alice Springs.

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Photograph from Territory NRM Award night.

 

 

 

Our Enhancing Habitat Workshop

Our recent Enhancing Habitat workshop, held at the Territory Wildlife Park, was a great success. The workshop was presented in collaboration with Territory Wildlife Park, Charles Darwin University (CDU) and Remote Area Tree Service. Over 45 Land for Wildlife members attended to learn about the different ways their properties can be improved as habitat for arboreal wildlife. Information was provided about the importance of tree hollows and nest boxes as habitat for native species, such as the threatened Black-footed tree rat. Practical demonstrations and arboreal animal encounters were also included, and members were given the opportunity to finish nest boxes to take home and install on their property.

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IMG_3412 (Medium)Dr Leigh-Anne Woolley, a researcher from CDU, gave an informative talk about her research into the decline of arboreal mammals in the NT and the use of nest boxes by these species. Leigh-Anne showed that nest boxes were used by several native mammals and the size of the hollow determined which animals were likely to use them.

Territory Wildlife Park assistant curator, Damien Stanioch, gave a practical presentation with Land for Wildlife coordinator Emma Lupin, of the several ways that nest boxes can be installed onto trees. Damien also talked about and answered questions on his experiences with the use of nest boxes. Afterwards, members had the opportunity to paint their complimentary nest boxes, which were generously made by the Palmerston Men’s Shed, with some products supplied by Bunnings.

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The team from Remote Area Tree Service gave a great demonstration on how hollows can be made manually by using chainsaw techniques on dead trees, branches and logs. This is a wonderful way to ‘speed up’ the natural process of hollow-forming.

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During lunch, staff from Territory Wildlife Park treated members to an up-close encounter of native animals which use hollows, including the sugar glider and threatened northern quoll and black-footed tree rat.

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A huge thanks to Territory NRM for funding this project and to the Territory Wildlife Parkfor hosting and the time of their always knowledgeable and passionate staff. Thanks to Dr Leigh-Anne Woolley for presenting and sharing her knowledge, to Remote Area Tree Services for their wonderful presentation; to Palmerston Men’s Shed for making our boxes and Bunnings for donating some of the materials and of course all the members that are getting involved….

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Enhancing Habitat- a project for landholders for the new year

There are many fauna species that are declining in number in the Top End region, often the reason is not completely understood or can be several reasons. As well as feral animal issues (including the Cane Toad invasion and feral cats) often the lack of hollows in trees and mid story fruiting trees cause animals to decline in number. One of the main reasons that hollows and the mid storey fruiting layer of the woodland landscapes disappear is fire (and of course land clearing). Fire that is too frequent, wide spread and late in the season drastically changes the composition of our woodland landscapes in the longer term as well as the more immediate death of wildlife such as young birds, lizards, in sects and some mammals.  Hollows which many nocturnal species depend on during the day are lost and although larger trees can recover after a hot fire, many of the mid story fruiting trees that many animals rely on as a food source do not survive.

In addition to having a good fire (and weed) management plan to avoid hot fires landholders can install nest boxes and enhance plant with food plants for wildlife. It takes many years for trees hollows to form and for mid story fruiting trees to mature, so in the interim shelter can be created by making and installing nest boxes which are created to house specifics species.

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To join the project landholders should be Land for Wildlife members.

  • The first step is to take part in a simple survey to count the tree hollows, canopy cover and presence of fruiting trees on the property, and recall the fire history, assistance will be given to do this.
  • Secondly there will be a chance to take part in a fire workshop, which is also open to others, to understand the effects of fire on wildlife.
  • Then comes the most exciting part, landholders and their families will be invited to attend a habitat creation day run in collaboration with Territory Wildlife Park to build their nest boxes (late wet/ early dry season). The nest boxes will be designed to a certain size and shape in the hope to house endangered species, but that can also be used by a variety of creatures and each property can receive up to 5 nest boxes. The templates will already be cut out and then just need assembling. Coming along will let participants know how to make nest boxes in the future and the best places to install them.
    Not only will the nest boxes be assembled in the workshop, but the team from Remote Area Tree Services will also give a demonstration of how to create habitat hollows from old dead trees with some chainsaw skills. There will be the chance to learn about and meet some of the creatures that will be housed.
  • Those involved can receive up to 50 habitat enhancing plants targeted towards their targeted fauna species.
  • The landholders will need to install the nest boxes and monitor them for uptake.

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TO REGISTER FOR THE PROGRAM PLEASE EMAIL_ elupin@greenignaustralia.org.au 
(there are limited spaces)

The date of the habitat creation workshop will be announced in the next couple of weeks.

This project is at no financial cost for the landholder as we are very thankful to have received funding from Territory NRM Threatened Species and Community Capacity Grants.

(Photo credit L. Mcmillian, Nest Box and E. Lupin Planchonia flower)