More Land for Wildlife in Adelaide River

We are welcoming more members every week who manage their land for native wildlife. Before we covered the story of Lloyd Beck from Adelaide River. Also in the region we have welcomed 2 other LFW properties in The Robin Falls region. Here are their stories-

Keith and Rick joined land for Wildlife late last year and shared with us their story-

Petit, Keith and Rick LFW sign (2)

Our place ‘Marumba’ ( good place ) its an Aboriginal word from the Jagera  (Yagera) people of  SE Qld where Rick was born.

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 We purchased the land 3 years ago after seeing a it advertised in the classified section of the NT News. Its outside Adelaide River near Robin Falls. Just under 140acres (63 hectares) of native bushland and no evidence of being farmed which appealed to us. There is a rocky ridge that crosses the block from north to south and from the top we look over the flood plain to the east and toward Litchfield NP in the west. We have a sheltered valley between the two long rocky ridges. There is a good mixture of habitats from treed areas to open grassland, hills, flood plains and numerous wet season billabongs.

Red leaves Keith and Rick's to house

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We are setting up an off the grid life from scratch, building using recycled materials as much as possible, we are always after old corrugated. iron, collecting rain water in tanks and using solar power. making as little impact on the planet as possible. We like to think of our place as a sanctuary for wildlife so no longer allow domestic pets such as dogs.

0ver the last 18 months we have been hosting volunteer helpers from around the world through Helpx and Workaway websites its been a fantastic experience to share our place, meet some amazing people from 18 to 68yrs and have the extra help.

One of things we love about being in nature with no neighbours is that we can spend all of our time not wearing clothes, which feels the more normal to us and allows us to feel more in tune to the surroundings

We recently started a Facebook page. ‘ Marumba – a good place’ if you want to see more of our place.

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Mike is another newly joined member of Land for Wildlife in the Adelaide River region. He manages a beautiful piece of rocky Warrai country with a small creek running through it, and it is his primary residence in the Robin Falls regionMike sign

The vegetation is continuous with uncleared bush that eventually joins Litchfield National Park to the west. The 150 hectares is managed for wildlife conservation and includes stunning plants typical of the region including  Corymbia dichromophloia,(small fruited boodwood) Corymbia dunlopii, Eucalyptus tectifica, Eucalyptus tintinnans,(Salmon Gum) Owenia vernicosa, Calytrix brownii, Gardenia megasperma. Erythrophleum chlorostachyus (Ironwood), Corymbia foelscheana.

Gardenia megaspermaThere are also plenty of fruiting plants on the lower slopes and lush riparian flora on the creek edges. The creek edges have been enhanced planted to restore the riverine margins and the inner 20 acres of the block is burnt with a documented fire strategy of patchwork burning, but beyond this fire is harder to manage due to unprescribed burning.

Wrigley Creek 98.7% of the land is calculated to be remnant vegetation with a small area around the house assigned to productive plants and a dam. Only a few problems with Mission grass remain and a cane toad population which is being managed. There are regular sighting of water monitors, echidnas, dingos, wallabies/ wallaroos, fruit bats and many reptile and bird species; but unfortunately it seems the mammal species has declined in the last 8 years; very occasionally a pig or cow may wander through.

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 Land management activities are often assisted by an informal group of friends and nearby landholders who enjoy being part of the process of conserving a valuable landscape.

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Neem trees are declared weeds

neem-treeIt has been announced by The NT Weeds Branch that Neem (Azadirachta indica) is being declared a weed.

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This well know tree, prized in Asia as an insecticide which is becoming a well distributed plant, out competing our native trees in the rural area and beyond, particularly by waterways. I have seen it on quite a few LFW assessments and many land holders are not entirely sure what it is, so I thought I would post this information. The fruit is eaten and spread by birds.

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Below is some information provided by the weeds branch and some FAQs-

The NT Government (weeds branch) has formulated a draft weeds management plan, it is available at http://www.lrm.nt.gov.au/weeds/find/neem, the plan is open for comment and you contact the department for more information.

What does the Weed Management Plan do?

Weed Management Plans establish the management requirements that must be undertaken by land managers with respect to declared weeds. They also describe best management practice control options. The Weed Management Plan for Neem (Azadirachta indica) will form part of a strategic approach to weed management in the Northern Territory, with the overall aim being to negate the impact of neem on the natural environment and the Northern Territory economy.

What is neem and why was it declared as a weed in the Northern Territory?

Neem is a fast growing introduced tree that is rapidly establishing in Top End waterways including the Katherine River. Neem’s high levels of seed production, extensive root systems and ability to regrow from suckers has enabled it to aggressively compete with native plants, even in healthy, intact environments. In July 2014, neem was declared a Class B (growth and spread to be controlled) and Class C (not to be introduced to the NT). Since the declaration of neem as a weed, it has been encouraging to see the amount of control that has taken place to date, however there is still more to do.

If I have neem on my property am I obligated to control it?

Landholders must use their best endeavours to control the growth and spread of neem, this includes controlling seedlings, saplings and, where feasible, mature trees. Although not required by the Plan, the removal of mature trees from urban settings is considered highly beneficial as this removes a source of neem seeds. It is illegal to buy, sell or transport neem plants of seeds and no new plantings are permitted within the Northern Territory.

 How difficult is neem to control?

The management of isolated neem plants and small infestations can be relatively straightforward. However, the control of large established infestations will require careful planning, prioritisation and budgeting. Results may not be immediately apparent, as repeated effort may be required to produce obvious reductions in distribution and density.

Where can I find a copy of the Plan and/or make comment?

The draft Plan can be found on http://www.lrm.nt.gov.au/weeds/find/neem and online feedback form http://www.lrm.nt.gov.au/lrm/community-consultation or by calling Weed Management Branch on 8999 4567 for a hard copy.

A summary paper has also been written to identify the key objectives of the Plan. Written submissions can be sent to to: Weed Management Branch Department of Land Resource Management PO Box 496 Palmerston NT 0831 Or emailed to weedinfo@nt.gov.au Darwin Jabiru Yulara Katherine Three Ways Alice Springs Tennant Creek Management Zone (Class B/C) http://www.nt.gov.au/weeds Management Zone What happens to my comments/feedback? The draft Plan will be available until Friday 17 April 2015. Comments received during this time will be taken into consideration when developing the final Weed Management Plan, which will then be sent to the Minister for Land Resource Management for approval in accor

Land for Wildlife near Adelaide River

At the end of last year we are lucky to welcome  some new LFW members near Adelaide River- there is some beautiful country in this region and some wonderful people managing their land for wildlife!

Here is one new member’s story, Llyod Beck, who is a fantastic long term Territory fella who cares an awful lot for his country and this wonderful Top End Landscape-

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I bought my block 8 years ago and have been actively managing it. It’s 80 acres (25 hectares) and backs onto the Adelaide River, just outside of the Adelaide River township- with Mount Bundey station original homestead on the other side of the River and is mostly intact vegetation.

I love our landscapes and I was born in Darwin and have always lived here. I lived for a long time at Howard Springs and then moved to Adelaide River, to be further out in the bush. I even tried to move away from here (to FNQ), when I felt all the development and growth was getting too much in the Darwin region but nowhere else felt like home. Now I feel it is better to be here trying to make positive change than not and I help out with environmental campaigns where I can. I love being on the land, fishing, exploring and we all need to look after it.

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My block had massive Gamba grass issues and many of the blocks around here are still covered in Gamba grass. It was half way up the hillsides and all down to the river. I slashed it and sprayed patches several times in a season, a massive job and after several years of going hard at it last year for the first time no Gamba grass reappeared. When I started managing the Gamba grass fire also stayed off the block and I don’t burn it and other plants are coming back (like fern leaf grevilleas). When you achieve something like that it feels good. Although I don’t pay too much attention to plant and animal names I have counted 74 different bird species here and love the variety of plants.

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Sometimes when we think about what we should do for the weekend, we end up relaxing under the trees by the River and realise there is nowhere else better to be.

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Urochloa humidicola- Tully grass- Introduced pasture grass!

Urochloa humidicola– Tully grass- Introduced pasture grass!

Just last weekend a Land for Wildlife Assessment was on a property with a lot of this grass. This is not a declared weed but can outcompete native plants in wetter areas and its presence is goring in the rural area of Darwin. I dug out this short article that Pete Mcfdden, a weed contractor that works in the area wrote last year- (and hope to get some better photos soon!)

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Another introduced pasture plant gone feral is the introduced species Humidicola. Present on many road verges in the rural areas it forms a dense stoloniferous mat and as an environmental weed can invade undisturbed bush land. Favouring wet areas it has even been considered as a “choking plant” to control Mimosa pigra.

Humidicola stays green most of the year and when it burns it produces very dense smoke that reduces visibility to almost zero. Humidicola has a thick root mass to feed underground fires that can burn for days until they break through the surface, producing new runaway wildfires. The ground can become so hot that it sterilises the soil, destroying other plants and seeds (NT Bushfire Volunteers)

Urochloa humidicola

The main mode of distribution is by root stolon growth and the plant steadily creeps along. Seed production is reportedly limited at lower latitudes and the vegetative reproduction is the main mode of propagation /spread.

Control with Glyphosate is effective but does require good coverage of all leaf areas and may require a follow up application. Recent experience at McMinns Lagoon Reserve confirms that control can be achieved in one season and no regrowth has been recorded from soil seed-banks or reshooting. As Humidicola prefers wet and innundative areas control is best achieved early in the wet season when access is easier.

When using any herbicide please read the label and use any appropriate personal protective equipment required.

Jacinda Brown, Bachelor wildlife photographer shares her story.

JB_Parrot_Red-winged_Aprosmictus erythropterus_20141129_04Jacinda Brown, wildlife photographer and Land for Wildlife member shares her story-

Jacinda is a well-known photographer, who captures beautiful images of our native plants and wildlife. She has been a Land for Wildlife member since 2011 and lives on a bush block, 20 kms west of Bachelor with her family. The block is just over 50 acres (22 hectares) and the Finniss River runs through it. Jacinda describes the block as a biodiversity haven amongst surrounded by Gamba grass.

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The property has been cared for, for the last 15 years by Jacinda’s partner who has avidly managed the Gamba grass and other weeds like Hyptis and Mission Grass. Now the property is pretty weed free, but it is a continuous process to maintain it. They also use mosaic burning for fire management.

Jacinda moved to Darwin from the Yarra Valley in 2002. She lived in Darwin for a couple of years before moving out bush where she works from home, making children’s books in her beautiful bush studio to educate and showcase, the beauty of nature.

The land that Jacinda and her family care for acts as habitat for a huge array of wildlife species, including reptiles, birds, mammals and insects.

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“It is always a joy when the huge olive pythons visit especially since the cane toad invasion.” Jacinda says one interesting thing in this area is that bandicoots haven’t been seen for 7 years. There are various theories why – one being that bandicoots are really sensitive to fire and Batchelor has many hot fires because of all the Gamba Grass. That and the toads, are a huge knock back for all wildlife.

She adds “I am amazed at the amount of money spent on the recent Banana eradication, when none can be found to get rid of toads and very little for Gamba grass.”

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Jacinda loves the constant learning experience, encountering new wildlife and discovering which call belongs to which creature, “Our most recent residential discovery is the oh so cute, Owlet-nightjar.” She says “Artists are always trying to represent nature, but nature is the greatest artist. Having a bio-diverse property is a true inspiration and there are daily rewards for the work required in maintaining a healthy ecosystem.

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Jacinda has just launched a new website, where you can view a wonderful movie about her block http://www.jacindabrown.com/movies.html , choose the film “Nowearji, a celebration of biodiversity” and also check out the wonderful photo galleries.

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Black footed Tree Rat

The black-footed tree-rat Mesembriomys gouldii is one of the largest rodents in Australia, weighing up to 830 g. It is an attractive solid rodent with long shaggy medium grey to black fur on top, pale underside, large black ears and a distinctive long hairy tail with a white tip. The Black-footed Tree-rat is largely arboreal (tree-dwelling), using its long tail for balance. Typical habitat is tall forests of Darwin Woollybutt and Darwin Stringybark, with a moderately dense mid-storey of shrubs and small trees and grassy understorey.  They are fairly solitary, nocturnal animals, sheltering in tree hollows and pandanus stands during the day. Hard fruits and seeds are a major component of their diet, supplemented by grass and invertebrates and other seasonal resources such as nectar rich flowers. Breeding can occur year-round with a peak of births in the late dry season. Litter size is small (1-3 young).

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The black-footed tree rat is one species that appears to have remained relatively abundant in the Darwin rural area, perhaps because of fire regimes. Recurrent intense fires reduce the abundance of fleshy-fruited shrubs favoured by Black-footed Tree Rats, as well as the availability of hollow trees. Clearing for agriculture has reduced the extent of their habitat in localised areas including north-east Queensland and parts of the Northern Territory. Perhaps you have seen one on your block?

Member’s story- Ray and Sue from Dundee Beach!

IMG_0123Ray and Sue joined Land for Wildlife after hearing about the scheme through Ray’s work colleague. He thought it sounded like a great idea and the couple joined up their block at Dundee Beach. Their block is in fact 2 blocks, one is 25 acres (around 10.8 hectares), where there are a couple of dongas made into a good sturdy bush dwelling with a deck which the couple bought in 2009. The other block, just next door and about 22 acres, (around 9 hectares) Ray and Sue purchased as a buffer block just over a year later, so they didn’t have to have any neighbours really near! They are pretty lucky as the lower end of their blocks becomes more low lying and lead into Melaleuca swampland which is in reserve. On one warm build up day Greg Leach and I from Land for Wildlife drove out to Dundee to see the block and make an assessment and join them up.

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Ray explains why they love being out bush on their block, even though they live in Darwin a lot of the time. “We just love being in the bush, if you are in town and a storm rolls in, you can’t really appreciate it, but here we can see the whole skyline and the storm roll past, you can see the pink light of sunset in the clouds.” “We can sit out and have a fire and watch the whole sky, the kids love coming out, it’s what it’s all about; we love the bush and the lifestyle.”

Sue said they started looking for a bush block a few years ago, they looked in Adelaide River and wanted something far away, but loved Dundee. “This is a special spot, when the old folks come up we watch the sunset, and we love that the sea is near, I am a mad keen fisho too”, Ray adds.

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A LFW assessment involves visiting the land to be put into the Land for Wildlife scheme and meeting the land managers, the vegetation types are present and intact, and the percentages of the land these make up,

We walked right around the blocks and down into reserve and found an array of bush tucker plants flowering or in fruit, including Buchanania obavata and Syzygium suborbicular

The land becomes thick with new Melaleca species and then into the reserve and swamp with large and beautiful Melaleuca viridiflora, casting huge shadows and making a wonderful cooler refuge. The whole block also has good breezes coming through. “I love my swamp, some people thought we were mad, but I love it.”” ”We don’t want to do anything with it, just have bush. My father in Victoria used to know all the tree names and I wasn’t so interested, but now I am older I am really into interested and want to know more.

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Amazing Cycads were flushing with new velvety grey leaves and orange mid ribs, they are quite sort after and seem a few have been pinched. The woodland is dense in some areas, from fire being kept out and all the mid story fruiting shrubs are a perfect refuge for wildlife.

Weeds –mimosa. “ I didn’t have a mission, but now I do, I am going to get rid of that mimosa.”

Sue and Ray say the only problems they have really are not being here all the time, so when they want to plant some shade trees in the cleared patch around the house they cannot water them. We suggest just fencing off a patch and letting natural regen do its thing.

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Voluntary Conservation for Top End Native landscapes