Tag Archives: Trees for Wildlife

Enhancing Habitat Update

140 of our nest boxes are up in trees on Land for Wildlife properties from Darwin to Katherine! They are hoping to attract our Black-footed Tree-rats and food plants for them are also being planted on each nest box property.

After our fantastic workshops, members have been busy painting and installing the boxes. Boxes have also been installed at 3 schools- Girraween Primary, Howard Springs Primary School and Milkwood Steiner School.

Some members got friends and family together to install the boxes and soem even got a little help from Emma.

Emma (LFW coordinator) even got on the radio to talk about the project…

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These are just some of our nest boxes looking fabulous in their gorgeous host trees

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And then, the next exciting part has been checking out the boxes with our new especially designed nest box camera, with the help of the landholders and our Green Army team who are learning about surveying.

 

So far we have not caught any mammals live on camera but we have got Eucalyptus leaf nest material (very likely to be from the Black-footed Tree-rat), droppings that look like those of the Black-footed Tree-rat and some small identified fluff balls (to be sent for analysis).

We have also found some other gatecrashers using the nest boxes, including many geckos, grasshoppers, spiders and European honey bees.

Check out this amazing (non native) bee colony that took up a nest box at Alison and Mike’s property in Humpty Doo, and then moved on.

Bees in nestbox July 2017Nestbox 5 at 135 Jefferis Road small

So no live pictures of our Tree-rat friends but evidence of some and sightings from landholders of BFTRs outside the nest boxes! We are hoping to hear about motion sensing cameras we can lend to our landholders soon and will be checking on the boxes in 3 months time! All the data is being collated as well as a map of the location of every nest box!

Now we will wait and see if anything moves in over the next few months, while our Green Army are busy planting 15, 000 trees for the Black-footed Tree-rat ! (yes 15, 000) on Land for Wildlife Properties.

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Trees for Wildlife- An update

 5000 trees have been planted on Land for Wildlife properties within our program to enhance habitat for the Black-footed Tree-rat
Over the wet season, mostly in January and February of this year we planted out over 5,000 tree species, grown by the Greening Australia plant nursery, that were chosen as a food source or habitat plant for the endangered Black- footed Tree rat (Mesembriomys gouldii), an NT native rodent which has been in decline over the last decade.
The project is run in collaboration with the Green Army and this fabulous team of young people helped plant out on 20 Land for Wildlife properties. The team also collected seed, propagated plants, assisted in the nursery and helped Land for Wildlife members in the program with some weed management.

We had a wonderful wet season and so the plants were given a good start and watering in. Landholders have also signed an agreement to look after the plants, keeping them watered until established and working on weed and fire management within the areas.

Above: The grand kids of Land for Wildlife members Margi and Digby, help a Green Army team member plant new trees at Howard Springs.


The team after another full day of Tree planting with Land for Wildlife members.


Land for Wildlife member Shelly from Herbert happy to receive her plants to re-vegetate a previously under cleared area.


The Green Army team at work planting at another property in Howard Springs


Land for Wildlife member Vanesha helps the team plant at her Humpty Doo property
There are over 20 native plant species being planted, including the Red Bush Apple (Syzygium suborbiculare), Green Plum (Buchananaia obovata), Billy Goat Plum (Terminalia ferdinandiana), Pandanus (Pandanus spiralis)Planchonia careya and various Eucalypts and Acacias. This first property backs on to the Leanyer Swamp, some of which is set aside for conservation, making it a great wildlife corridor.

After 9 months of helping collect seed, propagate, care for plants and undertake nursery operations, the Green Army team met landholders and planted out the trees. The team learnt not only practical skills, but social ones too and they had the chance to hear the stories and see a snippet of the lives of many land managers and how they all interact and care for the natural world.

Land for Wildlife is Branching Out

Our “Trees for Wildlife Program” got into the local news, with more tree plantings happening all the time through the monsoons with the Green Army helping with plantings….we will continue the program next year if more landholders would like to get involved. See the “Trees For Wildlife” Tab

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