Category Archives: Resources

A New Top End Wildlife Book

As we all know Australia’s Top End is home to an amazing array of unique and rare wildlife, and many of Australia’s most iconic National Parks.

A new wildlife book has now been released by the Environment Centre NT.

LAND FOR WILDLIFE DISCOUNT – It usually sells for $60 direct from ECNT. You can purchase it for $55 if you are a Land for Wildlife member!

This is a user-friendly and comprehensive field guide to the animals that live in one of the world’s wildlife hot-spots and the places visitors can go to see them.

Wildlife ECNT Book

The easy-to-use full colour guide features 700 species of wildlife. With over 2000 images this is a photographic showcase of unpresented quality. Every species is illustrated by one to three images, depicting different colour forms, juveniles, in flight etc. Concise, detailed information covers distinguishing features, habitats, and distribution and conservation status.

Watching wildlife, an ever-increasing activity, is made easy with the sections on national parks and protected areas.

A range of experts contribute in depth information on topics of current interest, such as crocodiles and cane toads.

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Top End Wildlife- Children’s Books- The Quoll

We have some very talented artists and story tellers in the Top End, and what better way to get the next generation to value our wildlife and landscapes and the connectivity between species,  than to intrigue and educate them through books, here is just the first of  a few great titles that we will feature.. .

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Sandra Kendall, Darwin resident and artist has written several books with a focus on loving our landscapes and the wildlife within-
My main aim is providing accessible images and stories for children about native wildlife to entertain and educate. The last couple of books have focused on urban wildlife to provide stories that Top End kids can claim particular affinity with with the hope that in turn this will stimulate interest in other local species. 

My first book “Quoll” (published by Windy Hollow Books 2008) was inspired by the Island Ark Project, a collaboration between Biodiversity North, The Territory Wildlife Park and The Gumurr Marthakal Rangers aiming to preserve a healthy population of Northern Quoll on offshore islands as the arrival of Cane Toads in Top End was pushing the species to the brink of extinction. The story of one quolls plight is told from the animals point of view as she tries to save her family from the Cane Toad ‘invasion’.

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(Scientific information about the Northern Quoll for the book was kindly provided by Dr John Woinarski in the info pages following the narrative)

The Northern Quoll (Dasyurus hallucatus) is a mammal native to northern Australia which weighs 300g- 1000g and has prominent white spots on its fur. It is carnivorous and eats a range of invertebrates including reptiles. It’s habitat is hollow logs, tree hollows and rock crevices.  

The Northern Quoll is listed as critically endangered in the Northern Territory and is listed as endangered within Australia as a whole. It has been recorded as rapidly declining in numbers over the last few decades. This decline is largely attributed to the introduction and spread of cane toads but also is affected by frequent and late season burning, which causes habitat loss.

In the Northern Territory the quoll is  restricted to the Top End. To assist its recovery private landholders can implement a Cane Toad eradication  program, prevent the loss of habitat, particularly tree hollows by protecting landscapes from hot fires and even create and place tree hollows with the property.


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For more information a fact sheet can be found here https://nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/205475/northern-quoll.pdf

NT Field Guide App for smart phones

field guideSo, apologies if you don’t have a smart phone, and we know it isn’t for everyone, but if you do have one this is a really wonderful ‘app’ that saves dragging various books out and about to identify wildlife.

This app, along with others for different states, has been developed by Museum Victoria.  It features full descriptions of over 600 species with photos and artwork, sound recording for birds and frogs, and distribution maps depicting where best to look for them.  This could keep you amused for hours.

We would love anyone that does have a smart phone (Android or Apple) to down load it, give it a go and feedback to us, so we can review it in our next newsletter.  Find out more about downloading it here or search in the ”App store” on your phone

If you are more of a book person, then the Environment Centre NT are working on a project to produce a Field Guide- Wildlife of the Top End.

Click the picture below to read the flyer

ECNT field guide flyer